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AIDS. 2000 Apr 14;14(6):637-46.

An early expansion of CD8alphabeta T cells, but depletion of resident CD8alphaalpha T cells, occurs in the intestinal epithelium during primary simian immunodeficiency virus infection.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, University of California Davis, 95616, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To evaluate changes in the phenotypic heterogeneity and function of CD8 T cells in the intestinal epithelium during primary SIV infection.

DESIGN:

Previous studies have shown an increased prevalence of CD8 T cells in the intestinal epithelium in HIV and SIV infections. As intestinal CD8 T cells are a heterogeneous population we evaluated their phenotypic distribution (CD8alphabeta, CD8alphaalpha) and function [interferon (IFN)-gamma production] during primary SIV infection.

METHODS:

The phenotype and functional potential of CD8 intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) prior to and following SIV infection were determined using flow cytometry.

RESULTS:

IEL were found to harbor CD8alphabetaCD3, CD8alphaalphaCD3 and CD8alphaalpha+CD3- T-cell subsets. Most of the CD8CD4 double positive IEL expressed CD8alphaalpha homodimers. In primary SIV infection the frequency of CD8alphabetaCD3 T cells increased dramatically whereas the frequency of CD8alphaalpha T cells declined. A higher frequency of CD8alphabetaKi-67 IEL was observed following SIV infection suggesting that local cell proliferation might have contributed to an increased prevalence of CD8alphabeta IEL. In contrast, a severe depletion of CD8alphaalphaCD4 IEL occurred which contributed to the depletion of CD8alphaalpha IEL. The CD8alphabeta IEL were the major producers of IFN-gamma in the intestinal epithelium and the frequency of IFN-gamma-producing CD8alphabeta IEL was enhanced considerably in primary infection.

CONCLUSIONS:

CD8alphabeta IEL may be important in generating early antiviral responses at the intestinal epithelium. However, alterations in CD8 T-cell subsets and their function may reflect early immunopathogenic events in the intestinal mucosa.

PMID:
10807186
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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