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J Reprod Med. 2000 Apr;45(4):327-31.

Subcutaneous drain vs. suture in obese women undergoing cesarean delivery. A prospective, randomized trial.

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1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 27599-7570, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine if subcutaneous drain or closure of the subcutaneous layer decreases the incidence of wound complications in obese women undergoing cesarean delivery.

STUDY DESIGN:

Seventy-six obese women undergoing cesarean delivery and with at least 2 cm of subcutaneous fat were randomized to one of three groups: group 1 had suture closure of the subcutaneous tissue, group 2 had placement of a subcutaneous closed suction drain, and group 3 had neither suture closure nor drainage.

RESULTS:

Wound separation occurred in 12 (15.8%), seroma in 5 (6.6%) and infection in 3 (4%). There were no reports of wound hematoma. The overall incidence of any wound complication (infection, separation, seroma, hematoma) was higher in obese women who received neither subcutaneous suture nor drain as compared to obese women who received either subcutaneous suture closure or subcutaneous drain. The incidence of major wound complications (infection or separation) was also higher in obese women who received neither subcutaneous suture or drain compared to obese women who received either subcutaneous suture closure or subcutaneous drain.

CONCLUSION:

The use of closed suction drainage in the subcutaneous space may reduce the incidence of postoperative wound complications in obese women who have at least 2 cm of subcutaneous fat and undergo cesarean delivery.

PMID:
10804490
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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