Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Clin Cardiol. 2000 May;23(5):341-6.

The use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors in patients with acute myocardial infarction in community hospitals. Michigan State University Inter-Institutional Collaborative Heart (MICH) Study Group.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, College of Human Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Previous studies documenting underutilization of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) have been limited to Medicare populations.

HYPOTHESIS:

This study examines ACEI prescription rates and predictors in a community sample of hospitalized patients with AMI.

METHODS:

The charts of 1163 community patients with AMI, prospectively identified at admission between January 1, 1994, and April 30, 1995, were reviewed.

RESULTS:

Only 64 of 158 (40%) patients considered ideal candidates for ACEI prescription were discharged with a prescription for an ACEI. In a multivariate logistic regression model, prior ACEI utilization [adjusted odds ration (OR) = 3.26; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.05-5.20], presence of congestive heart failure (OR = 2.33; CI = 1.50-3.61) and black race (OR = 2.20; CI = 1.34-3.64) were identified as positive predictors of ACEI prescription. Conversely, lack of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) measurement (OR = 0.46; CI = 0.28-0.75), LVEF > 40 ( OR = 0.27; CI = 0.18-0.40), and acute renal failure (OR = 0.08; CI = 0.01-0.44) were negative predictors. Women were also less likely to be discharged with an ACEI prescription (OR = 0.71; CI = 0.48-1.05). Furthermore, women were significantly less likely to have LVEF measured prior to discharge than were males (77 vs. 85%, p = 0.001).

CONCLUSION:

This study underscores the need for improvement in the utilization of ACEI in eligible patients with AMI. It also identifies opportunities for improvement in prescription rates, especially in women.

PMID:
10803442
PMCID:
PMC6654886
DOI:
10.1002/clc.4960230507
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center