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Ann Thorac Surg. 2000 Apr;69(4):993-7.

Primary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the lung.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Primary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the lung is a rare entity. Although the prognosis is favorable, clinical features, prognostic factors, and patient management have not been clearly defined.

METHODS:

We reviewed retrospectively the records of 48 patients operated on for primary pulmonary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The study group consisted of 21 male (44%) and 27 female (56%) patients with a mean age of 61.8 years. Thirty-seven and a half percent of patients were asymptomatic, and 62.5% were seen with pulmonary symptoms, systemic symptoms, or both. A definitive diagnosis was obtained by thoracotomy in 90% of patients, thoracoscopy in 8%, and anterior mediastinotomy in 2%.

RESULTS:

Complete surgical resection was possible in 19 patients (40%). A mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma (MALT) was found in 35 patients and lymphoma that was not of this type, in 13. The 1-year, 5-year, and 10-year survival rates were 91%, 68%, and 53%, respectively in the group with mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and 85%, 65%, and 64% in the group with lymphoma that was not of the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue type. None of the prognostic factors studied (mode of presentation, smoking history, bilateral disease, postoperative stage, complete resection, adjuvant chemotherapy, histology) significantly influenced patient survival.

CONCLUSIONS:

Primary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the lung occurs with nonspecific clinical features. Although patient survival is good, prognostic factors could not be identified.

PMID:
10800781
DOI:
10.1016/s0003-4975(99)01535-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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