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Int J Cancer. 2000 May 15;86(4):590-4.

Survival in operable non-small-cell lung cancer: role of p53 mutations, tobacco smoking and asbestos exposure.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland. sioris@saunalahti.fi

Abstract

Validated markers are needed to identify operable lung cancer patients with poor prognosis. About one-half of non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) carry a mutation in the p53 tumor-suppressor gene. We examined 101 NSCLC patients for surgical stage, completeness of resection, tobacco smoking, asbestos exposure, age, gender and p53 gene mutations as prognostic factors after a follow-up period of 4 years. Cox's multivariate regression model was applied to quantify the associations with overall and cancer-related survival. Patients with a wild-type p53 gene had an overall 4-year survival of 43% and those with a mutated p53 gene, 35%. In squamous-cell carcinoma, stage and heavy smoking, defined as the median of pack-years smoked, had prognostic significance for overall survival. Only stage was associated with poor cancer-related survival. Asbestos exposure was not associated with overall survival or cancer-related survival in squamous-cell carcinoma or adenocarcinoma. In adenocarcinoma, p53 mutation, in addition to stage, emerged as a significant predictor of poor cancer-related survival.

PMID:
10797276
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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