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Oral Oncol. 2000 May;36(3):272-6.

Mutation of p53 gene codon 63 in saliva as a molecular marker for oral squamous cell carcinomas.

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1
Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical and Dental College Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan.

Abstract

The inactivation of tumor suppressor gene (TSG) is important during multistage carcinogenesis. The p53 TSG is frequently mutated in oral squamous cell carcinomas. These mutations can serve as very specific markers for the presence of tumor cells in a background of normal cells. In this study, 10 oral squamous cell carcinoma patients and 27 normal dental students were collected from Chung Shan Medical and Dental College Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan. Extractions of DNA from saliva were obtained. Exon 4 and intron 6 within the p53 gene were amplified with polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) followed by DNA sequence analysis. DNA sequence analysis of PCR products revealed that five of eight (62.5%) tumor saliva samples and five of 27 (18. 52%) healthy saliva samples contained p53 exon 4 codon 63 mutations. These results were significantly different by using Chi-square test (P<0.05). The majority of the base substitutions were C deletions. Probable hot spots for the mutation were identified at exon 4 codon 63, which has not been observed before in head and neck cancers. Our study indicated that mutation of p53 codon 63 in saliva might be a molecular marker for oral squamous cell carcinomas. In addition, the amount of DNA recovered from saliva in most cases is sufficiently large and its quality suitable to enable PCR amplification which could be used in the search for mutations. The protocol described is rapid, cheap, and easy to perform, and may be useful for epidemiological studies for oral carcinogenesis.

PMID:
10793330
DOI:
10.1016/s1368-8375(00)00005-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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