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J Physiol Paris. 2000 Mar-Apr;94(2):99-104.

The antidepressant effect of an antiulcer pentadecapeptide BPC 157 in Porsolt's test and chronic unpredictable stress in rats. A comparison with antidepressants.

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1
Department of Pharmacology, Medical Faculty University of Zagreb, Croatia.

Abstract

Various antidepressants have antiulcer activity. Likewise, the models currently used in ulcers and depression disorders research have a considerable degree of similarity. Therefore, the possibility that depression disorders could be effectively influenced by a primary antiulcer agent with a cyto/organoprotective activity, such as the novel stomach pentadecapeptide BPC 157, was investigated in two rat depression assays. First, a forced swimming test (a Porsolt's procedure) was used. As a more severe procedure, chronic unpredictable stress (after 5 d of unpredictable stress protocol, once daily drug application during stress procedure, open field-immobility test assessment at fourth or sixth day of medication) was used. In a forced swimming test, a reduction of the immobility time in BPC 157 (10 microg, 10 ng x kg(-1) i.p.) treated rats corresponds to the activity of the 15 mg or 40 mg (i.p.) of conventional antidepressants, imipramine or nialamide, respectively, given according to the original Porsolt's protocol. In chronic unpredictable stress procedure, particular aggravation of experimental conditions markedly affected the conventional antidepressant activity, whereas BPC 157 effectiveness was continuously present. The effect of daily imipramine (30 mg) medication could be seen only after a more prolonged period, but not after a shorter period (i.e., 4-d protocol). In these conditions, no delay in the effectiveness was noted in BPC 157 medication and a reduction of the immobility of chronically stressed rats was noted after both 4 and 6 d of BPC 157 (10 microg, 10 ng) medication.

PMID:
10791689
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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