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Psychol Rev. 2000 Apr;107(2):289-344.

Time, rate, and conditioning.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles 90095-1563, USA. randy@psych.ucla.edu

Abstract

The authors draw together and develop previous timing models for a broad range of conditioning phenomena to reveal their common conceptual foundations: First, conditioning depends on the learning of the temporal intervals between events and the reciprocals of these intervals, the rates of event occurrence. Second, remembered intervals and rates translate into observed behavior through decision processes whose structure is adapted to noise in the decision variables. The noise and the uncertainties consequent on it have both subjective and objective origins. A third feature of these models is their timescale invariance, which the authors argue is a very important property evident in the available experimental data. This conceptual framework is similar to the psychophysical conceptual framework in which contemporary models of sensory processing are rooted. The authors contrast it with the associative conceptual framework.

PMID:
10789198
DOI:
10.1037/0033-295x.107.2.289
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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