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Chest. 2000 Apr;117(4):1065-72.

Dose-dependent effects of mandibular advancement on pharyngeal mechanics and nocturnal oxygenation in patients with sleep-disordered breathing.

Author information

1
Department of Oral Surgery, Chiba University School of Medicine, Chiba, Japan.

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES:

To examine dose-dependent effects of mandibular advancement on collapsibility of the passive pharynx and sleep-disordered breathing (SDB).

DESIGN:

Prospective, randomized study.

SETTING:

University hospital.

PATIENTS:

Thirty-seven adult patients with SDB.

INTERVENTIONS:

Oral appliances with 2-, 4-, and 6-mm advancement of the mandible.

MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS:

Overnight oximetry was performed with and without oral appliances. Each 2-mm mandibular advancement coincided with approximately 20% improvement in number and severity of nocturnal desaturations. Percentages of patients producing a > 50% improvement rate of the number of desaturations were 25%, 48%, and 65% with use of oral appliances with 2-, 4-, and 6-mm mandibular advancement, respectively. Static pharyngeal mechanics were evaluated in six completely paralyzed patients with SDB under general anesthesia with and without the oral appliances. Advancement of mandibular position was found to produce dose-dependent closing pressure reduction of all pharyngeal segments. Normalization of nocturnal oxygenation was associated with negative closing pressure, especially at the velopharynx.

CONCLUSIONS:

We conclude that improvement of both nocturnal oxygenation and pharyngeal collapsibility significantly depends on the mandibular position.

PMID:
10767241
DOI:
10.1378/chest.117.4.1065
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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