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Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2000 Apr;182(4):896-900.

Increased concentrations of plasma neuropeptide Y in patients with eclampsia and preeclampsia.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Japan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Epinephrine and norepinephrine are associated with the hyperstimulation of the sympathetic nervous system. Neuropeptide Y is a potent vasoconstrictive substance that is released in response to sympathetic nerve stimulation.

STUDY DESIGN:

The concentrations of plasma neuropeptide Y in pregnant patients with eclampsia (n = 8), preeclampsia (n = 8), and normotension (n = 8) were measured by radioimmunoassay on admission and 6 days after delivery. Correlations between plasma concentration of neuropeptide Y and mean arterial blood pressure were also evaluated in these patients on admission and 6 days after delivery.

RESULTS:

The plasma level of neuropeptide Y in women with eclampsia (P <.001) and preeclampsia (P <.003) was found to be significantly elevated with respect to that in normotensive pregnant women. At 6 days after delivery the concentration of plasma neuropeptide Y was significantly decreased in women with eclampsia, women with preeclampsia, and women with normotensive pregnancies compared with the value measured on admission (P <.0001, P <.0001, and P <.002, respectively). At admission the plasma neuropeptide Y level was positively correlated with mean arterial blood pressure in women with eclampsia and preeclampsia. However, no significant correlations were observed between plasma neuropeptide Y concentration and mean arterial blood pressure both at admission and 6 days after delivery in normotensive pregnant women and 6 days after delivery in women with eclampsia and preeclampsia.

CONCLUSION:

We have concluded that the level of neuropeptide Y in plasma is increased in women with eclampsia and preeclampsia. Elevated plasma neuropeptide Y levels may play a key role in the development of eclampsia and preeclampsia.

PIP:

This study investigated the plasma concentrations of neuropeptide Y associated with the pre-eclamptic and eclamptic conditions. Subjects included patients in the third trimester of pregnancy admitted at Dhaka Medical College Hospital, Bangladesh, from January 1996 to March 1998 with untreated eclampsia (n = 8), pre-eclampsia (n = 8), and normotensive pregnancy (n = 8). Nonpregnant healthy volunteer women (n = 8) were also enrolled. Blood samples were collected and the concentrations of plasma neuropeptide Y were measured by radioimmunoassay on admission and 6 days after delivery. The correlations between plasma concentration of neuropeptide Y and mean arterial blood pressure were also evaluated in these patients. The findings showed that the plasma level of neuropeptide Y in women with eclampsia (P 0.001) and pre-eclampsia (P 0.003) was significantly elevated in comparison with normotensive pregnant women. At 6 days after delivery the concentration of plasma neuropeptide Y was significantly decreased in women with eclampsia, women with pre-eclampsia, and women with normotensive pregnancies compared with the value measured on admission (P 0.0001, P 0.0001, and P 0.002, respectively). At admission the plasma neuropeptide Y level was positively correlated with mean arterial blood pressure in women with eclampsia and pre-eclampsia. However, no significant correlations were observed between plasma neuropeptide Y concentration and mean arterial blood pressure both at admission and 6 days after delivery in normotensive pregnant women and 6 days after delivery in women with eclampsia and pre-eclampsia. The study concluded that the level of neuropeptide Y in plasma is increased in women with eclampsia and pre-eclampsia.

PMID:
10764469
DOI:
10.1016/s0002-9378(00)70342-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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