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Am J Gastroenterol. 2000 Apr;95(4):1017-20.

Fermentation of dietary starch in humans.

Author information

1
Gastroenterology Division, Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital, Soweto, South Africa.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Dietary starch that escapes digestion in the small intestine may be quantitatively more important than dietary fiber as a substrate for fermentation. The products of fermentation have important implications in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer and other diseases of the large bowel, which are uncommon in Africans but have a high prevalence in Western populations.

METHODS:

Maize porridge is a staple of most blacks in South Africa. Stale maize porridge (high-resistant starch [HRS]) seems to induce greater fermentation in the large bowel than fresh maize porridge (low-resistant starch [LRS]).

RESULTS:

In the present study, healthy colostomy subjects fed stale maize porridge had significantly more production of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) (mean SCFA, HRS = 182.6; mean SCFA, LRS = 116.1; p < 0.05) in their colostomy effluent together with a significant drop in stool pH (mean pH, HRS = 5.91; mean pH, LRS = 6.70; p < 0.001). The SCFA butyrate (mean, HRS = 35.1; mean, LRS = 17.6; p < 0.05) and acetate (mean, HRS = 93.9; mean, LRS = 65.8; p < 0.05) were significantly elevated on the stale maize porridge diet when compared with consumption of fresh maize porridge. SCFA propionate (mean, HRS = 43.1; mean, LRS = 24.8; p = 0.05), also increased with stale maize porridge, but was not statistically significant.

CONCLUSION:

A high-resistant starch diet and its resultant increase in fermentation products may be partly responsible for protecting the black population against colorectal cancers and other large bowel diseases.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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