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J Neuropathol Exp Neurol. 2000 Apr;59(4):297-307.

Pathology of nerve terminal degeneration in the skin.

Author information

1
Department of Anatomy, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei.

Abstract

To characterize the pathology of epidermal nerve degeneration and regeneration, we investigated temporal and spatial changes in skin innervation of the mouse footpad. Within 24 hours after sciatic nerve axotomy, terminals of epidermal nerves appeared swollen and there was a mild reduction in epidermal nerve density (5.7 +/- 2.8 vs 12.7 +/- 2.2 fibers/mm, p < 0.04). Epidermal nerves completely disappeared by 48 hours (0.2 +/- 0.2 vs 14.2 +/- 0.9 fibers/mm, p < 0.001). Concomitant with the disappearance of epidermal nerves, the immunocytochemical pattern of the subepidermal nerve plexus became fragmented. At the electron microscopic level, the axoplasm of degenerating dermal nerves was distended with organelles and later became amorphous. Beginning from day 28 after axotomy, collateral sprouts from the adjacent saphenous nerve territory extended into the denervated area with a beaded appearance. They never penetrated the epidermal-dermal junction to innervate the epidermis. In contrast, 3 months after nerve crushing, the epidermis on the surgery side resumed a normal innervation pattern as the epidermis on the control side (10.3 +/- 3.9 vs 10.6 +/- 1.5 fibers/mm, p = 0.1). This study demonstrates the characteristics of degenerating and regenerating nerves, and suggests that successful reinnervation mainly originates from regenerating nerves of the original nerve trunks. All these findings provide qualitative and quantitative information for interpreting the pathology of cutaneous nerves.

PMID:
10759185
DOI:
10.1093/jnen/59.4.297
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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