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J Prosthet Dent. 2000 Apr;83(4):443-9.

Altered sensation associated with implants in the anterior mandible: a prospective study.

Author information

1
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C., Canada. jnwalton@unixg.ubc.ca

Abstract

STATEMENT OF PROBLEM:

Reported incidences of altered sensation after placement of mandibular implants range from a low of 0% to almost 44%, making it difficult to advise subjects regarding risk.

PURPOSE:

This study involved presurgical and postsurgical assessment of sensation in the lips and chins of 75 subjects, all of whom objectively demonstrated normal sensation before surgery.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

Objective and subjective tests were administered before, and at planned intervals for 12 months after, the placement of 2 implants in the anterior mandible.

RESULTS:

Objective changes were observed in only 1 subject and then only at the 2-week postsurgery interval. There were significant differences for all subjects in subjective sensation changes from baseline to 2 weeks after surgery (P =.007) and from 2 weeks to 6 months (P =.003) or 12 months (P =. 003). There was a higher percentage of subjects with normal sensation before surgery who reported sensory changes 2 weeks after implant placement (34% vs 24% for all subjects), but only 1% of subjects still reported altered sensation 1 year later. Although there were no significant differences between men and women in reports of altered sensation, more women than men noted sensation changes 2 weeks after implants were placed (25% vs 13%). There appeared to be no relationships among gender, the degree of ridge resorption, and reports of altered sensation.

CONCLUSION:

Thus, although approximately 24% of subjects may report altered sensation in the short-term after implant surgery in the anterior mandible, the problem appears to be a transient one, with only about 1% experiencing sensation changes 1 year after implant surgery.

PMID:
10756294
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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