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Am J Public Health. 2000 Apr;90(4):615-7.

The relation of residential segregation to all-cause mortality: a study in black and white.

Author information

1
Department of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC 27157-1063, USA. sjackson@rc.phs.wfubmc.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This study investigated the influence of an aggregate measure of the social environment on racial differences in all-cause mortality.

METHODS:

Data from the National Longitudinal Mortality Study were analyzed.

RESULTS:

After adjustment for family income, age-adjusted mortality risk increased with increasing minority residential segregation among Blacks aged 25 to 44 years and non-Blacks aged 45 to 64 years. In most age/race/gender groups, the highest and lowest mortality risks occurred in the highest and lowest categories of residential segregation, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results suggest that minority residential segregation may influence mortality risk and underscore the traditional emphasis on the social underpinnings of disease and death.

PMID:
10754978
PMCID:
PMC1446199
DOI:
10.2105/ajph.90.4.615
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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