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Int J Epidemiol. 2000 Feb;29(1):125-30.

Sensitization to individual allergens as risk factors for lower FEV1 in young adults. European Community Respiratory Health Survey.

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1
Respiratory and Environmental Health Research Unit, Institut Municipal d'Investigació Mèdica, Barcelona, Spain. jsunyer@imim.es

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Atopy may impair ventilatory function, but results are controversial. We assess the association between individual reactivity to allergens and the level of baseline maximal one-second forced expiratory volume (FEV1), by smoking and respiratory symptoms.

METHODS:

The 1472 participants (response 44.5%) of the five Spanish areas of the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS) who performed respiratory function tests, skin prick tests and/or specific IgE against common aeroallergens (e.g. mites, pets, mould, pollens) are included. Bronchial hyperreactivity (BHR) was measured with a methacholine challenge.

RESULTS:

After adjusting for BHR and smoking, in addition to the other allergens, skin reactivity to Alternaria (-208 ml; 95% CI :-451, 35) and IgE antibodies against cat (-124 ml; 95% CI:-269, 21) and Timothy grass (-115 ml, 95% CI:-190, -40) were associated with a decrease in FEV1 in females. Among males, skin reactivity to olive showed the strongest association (-111 ml; 95% CI: -261, 38). The associations were stronger in females. Smoking modifies the association for Alternaria and cat (P for interaction < 0.05). While cat is associated with a decrease in FEV1 in current smokers (-190 ml), Alternaria (-336 ml) was associated among never smokers. The exclusion of subjects with asthma symptoms, or adjustment for respiratory symptoms, led to similar results.

CONCLUSIONS:

We conclude that immunoresponse to individual allergens (particularly outdoor) is associated with the level of FEV1, and this association occurred independently of asthma, and in smokers and non-smokers, which may be of interest in natural history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

PMID:
10750614
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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