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Physiol Rev. 2000 Apr;80(2):649-80.

Human body composition: in vivo methods.

Author information

1
Body Composition Laboratory, United States Department of Agriculture/ARS Children's Nutrition Research Center, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas, USA. kellis@bcm.tmc.edu

Abstract

In vivo methods used to study human body composition continue to be developed, along with more advanced reference models that utilize the information obtained with these technologies. Some methods are well established, with a strong physiological basis for their measurement, whereas others are much more indirect. This review has been structured from the methodological point of view to help the reader understand what can be examined with each technique. The associations between the various in vivo methods (densitometry, dilution, bioelectrical impedance and conductance, whole body counting, neutron activation, X-ray absorptiometry, computer tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging) and the five-level multicompartment model of body composition are described, along with the limitations and advantages of each method. This review also provides an overview of the present status of this field of research in human biology, including examples of reference body composition data for infants, children, adolescents, and adults.

PMID:
10747204
DOI:
10.1152/physrev.2000.80.2.649
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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