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J Natl Med Assoc. 2000 Mar;92(3):131-5.

A comparison of smoking cessation efforts in African Americans by resident physicians in a traditional and primary care internal medicine residency.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, George Washington University Medical Center, Washington, DC 20037, USA.

Abstract

Tobacco use causes significant morbidity and mortality among African Americans. Physicians may inconsistently counsel patients against smoking. This retrospective chart review evaluated smoking cessation efforts in African Americans by internal medicine resident physicians in a traditional and a primary care residency program. One hundred twenty-nine African-American patients were evaluated by resident physicians in the traditional internal medicine residency. A tobacco use history was obtained in 84 patients. Twenty-eight patients smoked and two patients were counseled against smoking. Fifty-two African-American patients were evaluated by resident physicians in the primary care residency. A tobacco use history was obtained in 47 patients. Twenty patients smoked and 12 patients were counseled against smoking. There was a statistically significant difference in the rate at which smoking histories were obtained (p = 0.0011) and frequency of counseling against smoking (p < 0.0001). Gender analysis revealed that African-American women were less frequently asked about their smoking history (p = 0.0058) and counseled against smoking (p = 0.0016) by resident physicians in the traditional residency. African-American men received less counseling against smoking (p = 0.055) by resident physicians in the traditional residency. Resident physicians in the primary care residency program demonstrated greater smoking cessation efforts for African American patients. Smoking cessation should be emphasized in all internal medicine residency training programs.

PMID:
10745643
PMCID:
PMC2640562
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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