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J Natl Med Assoc. 2000 Mar;92(3):125-30.

Recruitment and retention: the development of an action plan for African-American health professions students.

Author information

1
Medical Center Minority Affairs Office, University of Kentucky Chandler Medical Center, Lexington 40536-0284, USA.

Abstract

This article presents results of a survey of African-American students enrolled in the colleges of medicine, dentistry, allied health, pharmacy, and nursing at the University of Kentucky. The survey was designed to determine the students' perceptions of factors that affect recruitment, enrollment, and academic progress of African-American students. Fifty-three of seventy students responded to survey questions addressing recruitment; admissions; and financial, social, personal, and academic support. Over 50% of medical students decided by junior high to enter a health career; only 15% of other students decided that early. The influence of a family member was more important in student decisions to enter nursing or medicine than in decisions by other students. Only 17% of medical students reported difficulty in locating sources of financial aid compared to 48% of those from other colleges. Perceptions regarding lack of social outlets were consistent among respondents from all colleges. Findings emphasize the importance of early exposure to the health professions, early outreach strategies, ongoing financial assistance, and the importance of establishing social networks for African-American students enrolled in a majority institution. The survey results were used to develop an action plan for the offices of minority affairs, student services, and academic affairs to address identified problems and concerns.

PMID:
10745642
PMCID:
PMC2640549
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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