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J Subst Abuse Treat. 2000 Apr;18(3):277-81.

An open-label study of a functional opioid kappa antagonist in the treatment of opioid dependence.

Author information

1
National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, 5500 Nathan Shock Drive, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA. rrothman@intra.nida.nih.gov

Abstract

Several lines of evidence, including the well-established observation that kappa opiate agonists produce dysphoria and psychotomimetic effects in humans, suggest that dysfunction of the endogenous kappa opioid system may contribute to opioid and cocaine addiction. The objective of this open-label study was to determine the effectiveness of a functional kappa antagonist as a treatment for opioid dependence. This was accomplished by combining a partial mu agonist/kappa antagonist (buprenorphine, 4 mg, sublingual) with a mu antagonist (naltrexone, 50 mg by mouth), theoretically leaving kappa antagonism as the major medication effect. Subjects were treatment-seeking heroin-dependent (as per Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed.) men (41 +/- 7 years old; 19 +/- 8 years heroin use) eligible for methadone maintenance. After inpatient detoxification and a naloxone-challenge test to verify that they were not physically dependent on opioids, subjects received naltrexone. Starting on the fourth day, patients also received liquid buprenorphine. All patients received medication at the clinic 6 days per week and a full program of psychosocial treatment. The major endpoints of the study were: pupil diameter to determine if the mu agonist effects of buprenorphine were blocked by naltrexone, urine toxicology, and retention in treatment. Five patients (33%) completed the 3-month study. Four were abstinent from opioids and cocaine for the entire study, and one was abstinent from opioids and cocaine for the last 9 weeks. Six subjects dropped out due to either minor side effects or disliking the sensation of sublingual buprenorphine. There were no significant changes in pupillary diameter. The positive response to treatment exceeds that expected from naltrexone alone (90% dropout). These promising results suggest that controlled studies of this medication combination should be conducted.

PMID:
10742642
DOI:
10.1016/s0740-5472(99)00074-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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