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Gynecol Oncol. 2000 Apr;77(1):116-20.

Radiation therapy for elderly patient with squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix.

Author information

1
Department of Radiology & Radiation Oncology, Gunma University School of Medicine, 3-39-22 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma, 371-8511, Japan. hsakurai@sb.gunma-u.ac.jp

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this study was to profile cervical squamous cell carcinoma in elderly patients undergoing radiation therapy and to study the treatment outcome and side effects of therapy.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

A retrospective analysis was carried out from the records of 380 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix who had been given radiation therapy between 1970 and 1994. The patients were divided into three age groups: under 70 years (youngest group; n = 215), 70 to 79 years (intermediate group; n = 124), and 80 years or older (oldest group; n = 41). Radiation therapy was performed by a combination of external beam therapy and three brachytherapy fractions using low-dose-rate sources.

RESULTS:

The 5-year overall survival rates in the youngest, intermediate, and oldest groups were 58, 50, and 33%, respectively, while cause-specific survival rates were 68, 70, and 65%, respectively. For the patients with stage III, the 5-year overall survival rates in the youngest, intermediate, and oldest groups were 59, 48, and 36%, respectively, while cause-specific survival rates were 72, 70, and 70%, respectively. There was no statistical significance in the 5-year intrapelvic recurrence rates among the three groups. Grade 3 or 4 complications occurred in 6.5% of the youngest, 11.3% of the intermediate, and 7.3% of the oldest groups.

CONCLUSION:

Radiation therapy with external beam combined with three fractions of low-dose-rate brachytherapy proved both highly effective and safe for senior patients with cervical squamous cell carcinoma.

PMID:
10739700
DOI:
10.1006/gyno.1999.5722
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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