Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Biol Chem. 2000 Mar 31;275(13):9324-31.

PDZ-dependent activation of nitric-oxide synthases by the serotonin 2B receptor.

Author information

1
Centre de Recherche Claude Bernard "Pathologie Expérimentale et Communication Cellulaires," IFR 6, Service de Biochimie, Hôpital Lariboisière AP-HP, 75010 Paris, France.

Abstract

Taking advantage of three cellular systems, we established that 5-HT(2B) receptors are coupled with NO signaling pathways. In the 1C11 serotonergic cell line and Mastomys natalensis carcinoid cells, which naturally express the 5-HT(2B) receptor, as well as in transfected LMTK(-) fibroblasts, stimulation of the 5-HT(2B) receptor triggers intracellular cGMP production through dual activation of constitutive nitric-oxide synthase (cNOS) and inducible NOS (iNOS). The group I PDZ motif at the C terminus of the 5-HT(2B) receptor is required for recruitment of the cNOS and iNOS transduction pathways. Indeed, the 5-HT(2B) receptor-mediated NO coupling is abolished not only upon introduction of a competitor C-terminal 5-HT(2B) peptide in the three cell types but also in LMTK(-) fibroblasts expressing a receptor C-terminally truncated or harboring a point mutation within the PDZ domain. The occurrence of a direct functional coupling between the receptor and cNOS activity is supported by highly significant correlations between the binding constants of drugs on the receptor and their effects on cNOS activity. The 5-HT(2B)/iNOS coupling mechanisms appear more complex because neutralization of endogenous Galpha(13) by specific antibodies cancels the cellular iNOS response while not interfering with cNOS activities. These findings may shed light on physiological links between the 5-HT(2B) receptor and NO and constitute the first demonstration that PDZ interactions participate in downstream transductional pathways of a G protein-coupled receptor.

PMID:
10734074
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Support Center