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J Cell Biochem. 1999 Jun 15;73(4):478-87.

Nitric oxide regulation of cGMP production in osteoclasts.

Author information

1
Department of Pathology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 35294-0007, USA.

Abstract

Bone resorption by osteoclasts is modified by agents that affect cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), but their relative physiological roles, and what components of the process are present in osteoclasts or require accessory cells such as osteoblasts, are unclear. We studied cGMP regulation in avian osteoclasts, and in particular the roles of nitric oxide and natriuretic peptides, to clarify the mechanisms involved. C-type natriuretic peptide drives a membrane guanylate cyclase, and increased cGMP production in mixed bone cells. However, C-type natriuretic peptide did not increase cGMP in purified osteoclasts. By contrast, osteoclasts did produce cGMP in response to nitric oxide (NO) generators, sodium nitroprusside or 1-hydroxy-2-oxo-3,3-bis(3-aminoethyl)-1-triazene. These findings indicate that C-type natriuretic peptide and NO modulate cGMP in different types of bone cells. The activity of the osteoclast centers on HCI secretion that dissolves bone mineral, and both NO generators and hydrolysis-resistant cGMP analogues reduced bone degradation, while cGMP antagonists increased activity. NO synthase agonists did not affect activity, arguing against autocrine NO production. Osteoclasts express NO-activated guanylate cyclase and cGMP-dependent protein kinase (G-kinase). G-kinase reduced membrane HCI transport activity in a concentration-dependent manner, and phosphorylated a 60-kD osteoclast membrane protein, which immunoprecipitation showed is not an H+-ATPase subunit. We conclude that cGMP is a negative regulator of osteoclast activity. cGMP is produced in response to NO made by other cells, but not in response to C-type natriuretic peptide. G-kinase modulates osteoclast membrane HCI transport via intermediate protein(s) and may mediate cGMP effects in osteoclasts.

PMID:
10733342
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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