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Free Radic Res. 2000 Mar;32(3):235-44.

Is allantoin in serum and urine a useful indicator of exercise-induced oxidative stress in humans?

Author information

1
Department of Health and Sports Sciences, Nippon Medical School, Kawasaki, Kanagawa, Japan. mikami_toshio/hss@nms.ac.jp

Abstract

To assess whether allantoin levels in serum and urine are influenced by exhaustive and moderate exercise and whether allantoin is a useful indicator of exercise-induced oxidative stress in humans, we made subjects perform exhaustive and moderate (100% and 40% VO2max) cycling exercise and examined the levels of allantoin, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and urate in serum and urine. Immediately after exercise at 100% VO2max, the serum allantoin/urate ratio was significantly elevated compared with the resting levels while the serum urate levels was significantly elevated 30 min after exercise. The serum TBARS levels did not increase significantly compared with the resting levels. Urinary allantoin excretion significantly increased during 60 min of recovery after exercise, however, urinary urate excretion decreased significantly during the same period. The urinary allantoin/urate ratio also rapidly increased during 60 min of recovery after exercise. Urinary TBARS excretion decreased during the first 60 min of the recovery period and thereafter significantly increased during the latter half of the recovery period. On the contrary, after 40% VO2max of exercise, no significant changes in the levels of urate, allantoin and TBARS in serum or urine were observed. These findings suggest that allantoin levels in serum and urine may reflect the extent of oxidative stress in vivo and that the allantoin which appeared following exercise may have originated not from urate formed as a result of exercise but from urate that previously existed in the body. Furthermore, these findings support the view that allantoin in serum and urine is a more sensitive and reliable indicator of in vivo oxidative stress than lipid peroxidation products measured as TBARS.

PMID:
10730822
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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