Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Clin Invest. 2000 Mar;105(5):615-23.

Paternal versus maternal transmission of a stimulatory G-protein alpha subunit knockout produces opposite effects on energy metabolism.

Author information

1
Metabolic Diseases Branch, National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive, and Kidney Diseases, National Institute of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.

Abstract

Heterozygous disruption of Gnas, the gene encoding the stimulatory G-protein alpha subunit (G(s)alpha), leads to distinct phenotypes depending on whether the maternal (m-/+) or paternal (+/p-) allele is disrupted. G(s)alpha is imprinted, with the maternal allele preferentially expressed in adipose tissue. Hence, expression is decreased in m-/+ mice but normal in +/p- mice. M-/+ mice become obese, with increased lipid per cell in white and brown adipose tissue, whereas +/p- mice are thin, with decreased lipid in adipose tissue. These effects are not due to abnormalities in thyroid hormone status, food intake, or leptin secretion. +/p- mice are hypermetabolic at both ambient temperature (21 degrees C) and thermoneutrality (30 degrees C). In contrast, m-/+ mice are hypometabolic at ambient temperature and eumetabolic at thermoneutrality M-/+ and wild-type mice have similar dose-response curves for metabolic response to a beta(3)-adrenergic agonist, CL316243, indicating normal sensitivity of adipose tissue to sympathetic stimulation. Measurement of urinary catecholamines suggests that +/p- and m-/+ mice have increased and decreased activation of the sympathetic nervous system, respectively. This is to our knowledge the first animal model in which a single genetic defect leads to opposite effects on energy metabolism depending on parental inheritance. This probably results from deficiency of maternal- and paternal-specific Gnas gene products, respectively.

PMID:
10712433
PMCID:
PMC289181
DOI:
10.1172/JCI8437
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for American Society for Clinical Investigation Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center