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J Hepatol. 2000 Feb;32(2):209-17.

Prevalence of diabetes mellitus in patients with end-stage liver cirrhosis due to hepatitis C, alcohol, or cholestatic disease.

Author information

1
Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology and Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA. schwartz.roberta@mayo.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIMS:

The aims were to study: 1) the prevalence of diabetes mellitus in patients with end-stage liver cirrhosis due to hepatitis C, alcohol, or cholestatic liver disease, 2) viral and host immunogenetic factors that may predispose to diabetes, and 3) liver transplantation outcome in patients with or without diabetes.

METHODS:

Fasting blood glucose values of patients who underwent liver transplantation because of hepatitis C-related cirrhosis (73 patients) were compared with those of patients with cirrhosis due to cholestatic (78 patients) or alcoholic liver disease (53 patients) and to a general population. Data on diabetes prevalence in a population without liver cirrhosis was based on the prevalence of diabetes in Olmsted County, Minnesota, residents. HLA was determined using serologic assays. Hepatitis C virus genotypes were determined with polymerase chain reaction amplification and direct sequencing. Hepatitis G RNA was detected with polymerase chain reaction. Liver transplantation outcome in patients with or without diabetes was determined with rejection, retransplantation, or death at 1 year after transplantation as end points.

RESULTS:

Of 64 patients with hepatitis C alone, 16 (25%) had diabetes before transplantation compared with 1 of 78 (1.3%) with cholestatic liver disease (p= 0.0001) and 10 of 53 (19%) with alcoholic liver disease (p=0.36). Nine patients had hepatitis C plus cholestatic liver disease; one of these (11%) had diabetes. The prevalence of diabetes in patients with cholestatic liver cirrhosis was not different from that of the general population. The frequency of hepatitis G virus coinfection, HLA-DR3, or HLA-DR4 in hepatitis C and diabetes was not different from that of hepatitis C alone. The distribution of hepatitis C virus genotype was similar in those with and those without diabetes. Diabetes was not associated with increased risk of rejection, retransplantation, or death at 1 year after transplantation, and had no impact on overall survival after transplantation.

CONCLUSIONS:

1) The risk of diabetes is not increased in patients with liver cirrhosis due to cholestatic liver disease but is in patients with liver cirrhosis due to hepatitis C or alcoholic liver disease; 2) cofactors (age, sex, body mass index, hepatitis G virus coinfection, hepatitis C virus genotype, or HLA-DR3/DR4) did not explain the increased risk of diabetes in patients with hepatitis C; 3) diabetes before liver transplantation did not change the outcome at 1 year after transplantation or survival.

PMID:
10707860
DOI:
10.1016/s0168-8278(00)80065-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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