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J Hypertens. 1999 Dec;17(12 Pt 2):1859-65.

Sibling resemblance of erythrocyte ion transporters in French-Canadian sibling-pairs affected with essential hypertension.

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1
CHUM Research Center, University of Montreal, PQ, Canada.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Erythrocyte Na+/Li+ countertransport and Na+,K+ cotransport are increased in some Caucasians with essential hypertension. This study examines the relative contributions of genetic and shared environmental factors to the activity of these ion carriers in French-Canadian sibling-pairs affected with essential hypertension.

DESIGN:

The activity of Na+/Li+ countertransport and Na+,K+ cotransport (rate of Na+ o-dependent Li+ efflux and bumetanide-sensitive 86Rb influx, respectively) was measured in 122 French-Canadian siblings with essential hypertension, including 36 brother/brother and 48 sister/sister pairs. Sibling/sibling correlations were estimated using the FCOR program of the S.A.G.E. package.

RESULTS:

Na+/Li+ countertransport and Na+,K+ cotransport were respectively higher by 27% (P = 0.002) and 42% (P = 0.0009) in erythrocytes from men compared with women. Intra-individual correlation analysis did not reveal a significant effect of age on the activity of these ion transporters in both males and females, and an influence of plasma lipids (triglycerides, cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, high-density lipoprotein) in females. In males, Na+,K+ cotransport was correlated with the level of serum triglycerides only (P = 0.01). Familial correlation analysis showed that sibling resemblance of Na+/Li+ countertransport and Na+,K+ cotransport was higher in men (r = 0.26 and 0.39) than in women (r = 0.01 and 0.03, respectively).

CONCLUSION:

The present data indicate that different factors contribute to the regulation of monovalent ion carriers in erythrocytes from Caucasian men and women with essential hypertension. The activity of erythrocyte Na+/Li+ countertransport and Na+,K+ cotransport appears to be more strongly determined by inheritable factors in men than in women.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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