Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Eur J Pain. 1998 Mar;2(1):43-52.

Pain, coping and psychological well-being in late life.

Author information

1
Clinic for Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, University Hospital Essen, Germany

Abstract

In the present article, the relationships between pain, coping, functional capacity and psychological well-being are examined in a population of older patients (>/=60 years; n=202) treated for a variety of somatic complaints in a university-affiliated hospital. Results indicate that moderate to extreme pain is common in older patients and often occurs in several body regions simultaneously. Extreme pain in one or more body regions is associated with reduced daily functional capacity, lower values for life satisfaction and self-evaluated competence, and more negative attitudes towards the present and future. Results of a hierarchical cluster analysis reveal interindividual differences in coping approaches among older patients suffering from extreme pain; they also emphasize the importance of cognitive strategies and life-review coping. Relevance for clinical practice with older pain patients is discussed.In the present article, the relationships between pain, coping, functional capacity and psychological well-being are examined in a population of older patients (>/=60 years; n=202) treated for a variety of somatic complaints in a university-affiliated hospital. Results indicate that moderate to extreme pain is common in older patients and often occurs in several body regions simultaneously. Extreme pain in one or more body regions is associated with reduced daily functional capacity, lower values for life satisfaction and self-evaluated competence, and more negative attitudes towards the present and future. Results of a hierarchical cluster analysis reveal interindividual differences in coping approaches among older patients suffering from extreme pain; they also emphasize the importance of cognitive strategies and life-review coping. Relevance for clinical practice with older pain patients is discussed.

PMID:
10700300

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center