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Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2000 Jan 30;52(1):11-6.

Airway foreign bodies in childhood.

Author information

1
Division of Ambulatory Pediatrics, Institute of Child Health, University of Istanbul, Capa 34390, Istanbul, Turkey.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To define clinical spectrum of airway foreign body aspiration in children and to evaluate the outcome and complications.

METHODS:

A total of 53 patients (27 girls, 26 boys) with a mean age of 30.0+/-32.7 months, who aspirated foreign bodies were treated with bronchoscopy were divided into two groups with respect to the time they were diagnosed as early (Group 1, n=22, </=24 h after aspiration) and late diagnosed group (Group 2, n24 h after aspiration). The two groups were followed up prospectively for complications.

RESULTS:

A total of 72% of patients were under a 3-year age group. Choking episode history was reported in 32% of patients but when families were questioned about it more in detail the rate increased to 51%. Acute episode of choking seemed trivial most of the families. Cough (69.8%), decreased breath sounds (52.8%) and wheezing (45.1%) were predominant symptoms. Sunflower seed (32. 1%) and peanuts (15.1%) were noted as common aspirated materials. Air trapping (59%) and consolidation (47%) were the most frequent radiological findings especially in the late diagnosed group (P<0. 01). Patients who aspirated organic materials frequently developed pneumonia diagnosed in late period after aspiration.

CONCLUSION:

Pediatricians must be conscious to check for foreign body aspiration who have sudden onset of cough and wheezing episode. In any suspicion, a bronchoscopy should be considered even if there is not any positive history for aspiration. Children should be followed up after bronchoscopy for complications.

PMID:
10699234
DOI:
10.1016/s0165-5876(99)00283-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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