Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Am J Psychiatry. 2000 Mar;157(3):454-6.

Salivary cortisol in panic attacks.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, The University of Göttingen, Germany. bbandel@gwdg.de

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Documentation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis disturbance in panic disorder has been inconsistent. Increased cortisol levels have been associated with altered HPA function due to stress. The authors examined salivary cortisol levels in spontaneously occurring, unprovoked panic attacks.

METHOD:

Patients with panic disorder (N=25) collected saliva samples when panic attacks occurred. Levels of cortisol in the saliva samples were determined and were compared with levels in comparison samples of saliva obtained 24 hours after the panic attack occurred.

RESULTS:

During spontaneous panic attacks there was a subtle but significant elevation of cortisol levels, compared with levels obtained 24 hours later. No significant correlations were found between the cortisol elevations during panic attacks and the severity of the attack as measured by using the Acute Panic Inventory or the severity of illness as measured by using the Panic and Agoraphobia Scale.

CONCLUSIONS:

Saliva sampling may be a useful method for investigating neuroendocrine parameters during spontaneously occurring panic attacks.

PMID:
10698825
DOI:
10.1176/appi.ajp.157.3.454
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon
Loading ...
Support Center