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J Neuroimmunol. 2000 Mar 1;103(2):165-70.

Chemokines are produced in the brain early during the course of experimental African trypanosomiasis.

Author information

1
Division of Infectious Diseases, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. ahmed.sharafeldin@impi.ki.se

Abstract

African trypanosomiasis is characterized by progressive central nervous system (CNS) involvement. Using single and double immunohistochemistry, we evaluated the induction of alpha- and beta-chemokines in brains of Sprague-Dawley rats infected with Trypanosoma brucei brucei (T. b. brucei) and identified their cellular source. The results showed high production of MIP-2, RANTES and MIP-1alpha and to a lower extend MCP-1 in infected animals compared to controls. MIP-2, RANTES and MIP-1alpha were produced early by astrocytes and microglia and later by macrophages and T-cells. These findings suggest that chemokines may contribute to the immunopathogenesis that occurs in the CNS early during infections.

PMID:
10696911
DOI:
10.1016/s0165-5728(99)00238-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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