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Nutr Cancer. 1999;35(2):130-6.

Decreased growth of human prostate LNCaP tumors in SCID mice fed a low-fat, soy protein diet with isoflavones.

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1
Department of Urology, University of California, Los Angeles 90095, USA. waronson@ucla.edu

Abstract

Epidemiological studies suggest that high intake of dietary fat is a risk factor for the development of clinical prostate cancer. Soy protein has also been proposed to play a role in the prevention of prostate cancer, and one of the isoflavones in soy protein, genistein, inhibits the growth of human prostate cancer cell lines in vitro. This study was designed to evaluate whether altering dietary fat, soy protein, and isoflavone content affects the growth rate of a human androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cell line (LNCaP) grown in severe-combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. SCID mice were randomized into four dietary groups: high-fat (42.0 kcal%) + casein, high-fat (42.0 kcal%) + soy protein + isoflavone extract, low-fat (12.0 kcal%) + casein, and low-fat (12.0 kcal%) + soy protein + isoflavone extract. After two weeks on these diets, the mice were injected subcutaneously with 1 x 10(5) LNCaP tumor cells and placed in separate cages (1 mouse/cage) to strictly control caloric intake. Isocaloric diets were given 3 days/wk, and tumor sizes were measured once per week. The tumor growth rates were slightly reduced in the group that received the low-fat + soy protein + isoflavone extract diet compared with the other groups combined (p < 0.05). In addition, the final tumor weights were reduced by 15% in the group that received the low-fat + soy protein + isoflavone extract diet compared with the other groups combined (p < 0.05). In this xenograft model for prostate cancer, there were statistically significant effects on tumor growth rate and final tumor weight attributable to a low-fat + soy protein + isoflavone extract diet.

PMID:
10693166
DOI:
10.1207/S15327914NC352_6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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