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J Clin Child Psychol. 2000 Mar;29(1):17-29.

Parenting practices and child disruptive behavior problems in early elementary school. Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group.

Author information

1
Department of Applied Behavior and Communication Sciences, University of Oregon, Eugene 97403, USA. bstorm@darkwing.uoregon.edu

Abstract

Examined the hypothesis that distinct parenting practices may be associated with type and profile of a child's disruptive behavior problems (e.g., oppositional, aggressive, hyperactive). Parents of 631 behaviorally disruptive children described the extent to which they experienced warm and involved interactions with their children and the extent to which their discipline strategies were inconsistent and punitive and involved spanking and physical aggression. As expected from a developmental perspective, parenting practices that included punitive interactions were associated with elevated rates of all child disruptive behavior problems. Low levels of warm involvement were particularly characteristic of parents of children who showed elevated levels of oppositional behaviors. Physically aggressive parenting was linked more specifically with child aggression. In general, parenting practices contributed more to the prediction of oppositional and aggressive behavior problems than to hyperactive behavior problems, and parenting influences were fairly consistent across ethnic groups and sex.

PMID:
10693029
PMCID:
PMC2764296
DOI:
10.1207/S15374424jccp2901_3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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