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Transfusion. 2000 Feb;40(2):193-200.

Pressure cycling technology: a novel approach to virus inactivation in plasma.

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1
BBI-BioSeq, Inc., Gaithersburg, MD 20977, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Hydrostatic-pressure virus inactivation is a novel approach to the inactivation of pathogens in plasma and blood-derived components, that retains the therapeutic properties of these products.

STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS:

A custom-built apparatus was used to pressurize human plasma samples spiked with lambda phage. Phage titer and plasma protein activities were monitored after pressure treatment.

RESULTS:

Pressure-mediated inactivation of lambda phage was found to be an effective means for virus inactivation, particularly when performed at near-zero (0 degrees C) temperatures, rather than at temperatures above 20 degrees C and below -40 degrees C. The efficiency of inactivation was improved by an increase in applied pressure and repeated cycling from atmospheric to high pressure. In contrast, activities of plasma proteins alkaline phosphatase and total amylase did not vary with temperature and remained within 29 percent and 6 percent, respectively, of starting values after the same pressure treatments. By combining cycling, near-zero temperatures, and high pressure, phage titers in serum were reduced approximately 6 log after 10 to 20 minutes of treatment. Activities of plasma proteins IgG, IgM, and factor X were at 104 percent, 89 percent, and 80 percent, respectively, of starting values after 20 minutes of the same temperature and pressure treatment.

CONCLUSION:

High-pressure procedures may be useful for the inactivation of viruses in blood and other protein-containing components.

PMID:
10686003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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