Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Virology. 2000 Mar 1;268(1):218-25.

A chloroplastic RNA polymerase resistant to tagetitoxin is involved in replication of avocado sunblotch viroid.

Author information

1
Instituto de Biología Molecular y Celular de Plantas (UPV-CSIC), Universidad Politécnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera 14, Valencia, 46022, Spain.

Abstract

Avocado sunblotch viroid (ASBVd), the type species of the family Avsunviroidae, replicates and accumulates in the chloroplast. Two main chloroplastic RNA polymerases have been described: the plastid-encoded polymerase (PEP) with a multisubunit structure similar to the Escherichia coli enzyme and a single-unit nuclear-encoded polymerase (NEP) resembling phage RNA polymerases. On a different basis, sensitivity to tagetitoxin, two major RNA polymerase activities, tagetitoxin sensitive (TS) and resistant (TR), have been found in plastids. The most plausible candidates for the TS and TR RNA polymerases are PEP and NEP, respectively. To gain an insight into the enzymology of the polymerization of ASBVd strands, purified chloroplast preparations from ASBVd-infected leaves were assayed for their in vitro ability to transcribe ASBVd RNAs together with some representative genes (psbA, 16SrDNA, accD, and rpoB) of the three classes of chloroplastic genes according to their promoter structure. High concentrations of alpha-amanitin had no effect on gene or on viroid transcription, but tagetitoxin (5-10 microM) prevented transcription of all these genes without affecting synthesis of ASBVd strands; only at higher tagetitoxin concentrations (50-100 microM) was a 25% inhibition observed. These results suggest that NEP is the RNA polymerase required in ASBVd replication, although the participation of another TR RNA polymerase from the chloroplast cannot be excluded.

PMID:
10683343
DOI:
10.1006/viro.1999.0161
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center