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Adv Perit Dial. 1999;15:269-72.

Response to early measles-mumps-rubella vaccination in infants with chronic renal failure and/or receiving peritoneal dialysis.

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1
Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA.

Abstract

Achieving immunity to childhood viral infections before renal transplantation is crucial. However, children with chronic renal failure (CRF) may respond poorly to vaccination, making it difficult to achieve immunity before transplantation, particularly if they will require transplantation at a young age. To address this problem, we developed a protocol of early measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccination in infants with CRF. Nine infants received MMR vaccine at a mean age of 11.6 +/- 2.5 months. When vaccinated, 6 of the children (67%) were on peritoneal dialysis, and 3 (33%) had CRF [glomerular filtration rate (GFR) < 30 mL/min/1.73 m2]. Eight patients were later transplanted at a mean age of 16.8 +/- 4.8 months. Titers were measured before transplantation in all patients. Response to vaccination was excellent, with 89% developing immunity to measles, 88% developing immunity to mumps, 100% developing immunity to rubella, and 88% developing immunity to all three components of the vaccine. These response rates were equivalent to, or slightly better than, those previously reported by Schulman for older children (19 +/- 6 months) on dialysis: 80% for measles, 50% for mumps, 100% for rubella, and 30% for all three components. We conclude that early MMR vaccination induces immunity in most infants with CRF, even those on peritoneal dialysis. Response rates are similar to those previously reported in older children. This approach may help to facilitate transplantation in young infants by achieving immunity earlier than traditional vaccination schedules.

PMID:
10682116
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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