Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Obes Res. 2000 Jan;8(1):12-9.

Heart rate variability in obese children: relations to total body and visceral adiposity, and changes with physical training and detraining.

Author information

1
Georgia Prevention Institute, Department of Pediatrics, Medical College of Georgia, 30912, USA. bgutin@mail.mcg.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Heart rate variability provides non-invasive information about cardiac parasympathetic activity (PSA). We determined in obese children: (1) relations of baseline PSA to body composition and hemodynamics; (2) effects of physical training (PT) and cessation of PT; and (3) which factors explained individual differences in responsivity of PSA to the PT.

RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES:

The root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD) was the index of PSA. Obese children (n = 79) were randomly assigned to groups that participated in PT during the first or second 4-month periods of the study.

RESULTS:

Baseline RMSSD was significantly (p<0.05) associated with lower levels of: fat mass, fat-free mass, subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue, resting heart rate (HR), resting systolic blood pressure, and exercise HR. Stepwise multiple regression produced a final model (R2 = 0.36) that included only resting HR. The analysis of changes over the three time points of the study found a significant (p = 0.026) time by group interaction, such that RMSSD increased during periods of PT and decreased following cessation of PT. Greater individual increases in response to the PT (p<0.05) were seen in those who had lower pre-PT RMSSD levels, showed the greatest decreases in resting HR, and increased most in vigorous physical activity. The final regression model retained only the change in resting HR as a significant predictor of the changes in the RMSSD (R2 = 0.23).

DISCUSSION:

Regular exercise that improved fitness and body composition had a favorable effect on PSA in obese children.

PMID:
10678254
DOI:
10.1038/oby.2000.3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center