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Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2000 Jan;73(1):65-8.

Urinary nickel as bioindicator of workers' Ni exposure in a galvanizing plant in Brazil.

Author information

1
Escola de Farmacia e Odontologia de Alfenas, Departamento de Análises Clínicas, Alfenas, Brazil. marelisa@int.efoa.br

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We measured urinary nickel (U-Ni) in ten workers (97 samples) from a galvanizing plant that uses nickel sulfate, and in ten control subjects (55 samples) to examine the association between occupational exposure to airborne Ni and Ni absorption.

METHODS:

Samples from the exposed group were taken before and after the work shift on 5 successive workdays. At the same time airborne Ni (A-Ni) was measured using personal samplers. Ni levels in biological material and in the airborne were determined by a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry validated method. In the control group the urine samples were collected twice a day, in the before and after the work shift, on 3 successive days.

RESULTS:

Ni exposure low to moderate was detected in all the examined places in the plant, the airborne levels varying between 2.8 and 116.7 micrograms/m3 and the urine levels, from samples taken postshift, between 4.5 and 43.2 micrograms/g creatinine (mean 14.7 micrograms/g creatinine). Significant differences in U-Ni creatinine were seen between the exposed and control groups (Student's t test, P < or = 0.01). A significant correlation between U-Ni and A-Ni (r = 0.96; P < or = 0.001) was detected. No statistical difference was observed in U-Ni collected from exposed workers in the 5 successive days, but significant difference was observed between pre- and postshift samples.

CONCLUSIONS:

Urinary nickel may be used as a reliable internal dose bioindicator in biological monitoring of workers exposed to Ni sulfate in galvanizing plants regardless of the day of the workweek on which the samples are collected.

PMID:
10672494
DOI:
10.1007/pl00007940
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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