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Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2000 Jan;44(1):17-23.

Lipid peroxidation induced by an early inflammatory response in endotoxaemia.

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1
Department of Geriatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Endotoxaemic challenge promptly causes lipid peroxidation. Porcine endotoxaemia can be used to replicate severe human septic shock. This model was used to evaluate non-enzymatic [8-Iso-prostaglandin F2alpha (8-Iso-PGF2alpha)] and enzymatic [15-keto-13,14-dihydro-prostaglandin F2alpha (15-K-DH-PGF2alpha)] lipid peroxidation, respectively, in relation to survival. The aim of this study was to correlate, if possible, pathophysiologic events during endotoxaemia to the levels of these arachidonic acid metabolites.

METHODS:

Nineteen pigs were anaesthetised, monitored (circulatory and respiratory variables in relation to lipid peroxidation) and given a continuous 6 h E. coli endotoxin (10 microg x kg(-1) x h(-1)) infusion. All animals were mechanically ventilated at constant tidal volumes and the inspired oxygen fraction was kept constant during the experimental period.

RESULTS:

This endotoxin infusion caused expressed derangements in all pigs and death in 9 of them. The levels of 8-Iso-PGF2alpha, indicating oxidative injury, were different in time course, magnitude and fashion between survivors and non-survivors. The levels of 15-K-DH-PGF2alpha, indicating inflammatory response, showed a similar pattern. At 1 h the CO2 partial pressure in arterial blood was significantly higher in non-surviving pigs and correlated (r: 0.7; P<0.05) to the levels of 15-K-DH-PGF2alpha. Prostaglandin F2alpha is mainly metabolised in the lung. The lung weights were significantly (P<0.05) higher in non-surviving than in surviving animals. Both free radical and cyclooxygenase catalysed oxidative modification occurs during endotoxaemia.

CONCLUSION:

Increased metabolism and inflammation, as evaluated by 15-K-DH-PGF2alpha, in the group of non-survivors may mediate the increase in arterial CO2. Thus, increased lipid peroxidation seems to be associated with endotoxaemic organ dysfunction and increased mortality.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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