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Exp Cell Res. 2000 Feb 25;255(1):102-13.

The carboxy terminus of AFAP-110 modulates direct interactions with actin filaments and regulates its ability to alter actin filament integrity and induce lamellipodia formation.

Author information

1
2822 MBR Cancer Center, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506-9300, USA.

Abstract

The actin filament-associated protein AFAP-110 is an SH2/SH3 binding partner for Src. AFAP-110 contains several protein-binding motifs in its amino terminus and has been hypothesized to function as an adaptor molecule that could link signaling proteins to actin filaments. Recent studies using deletional mutagenesis demonstrated that AFAP-110 can alter actin filament integrity in SV40 transformed Cos-1 cells. Thus, AFAP-110 may be positioned to modulate the effects of Src upon actin filaments. In this report, we sought to determine whether (a) AFAP-110 could interact with actin filaments directly and (b) deletion mutants could affect actin filament integrity and cell shape in untransformed fibroblast cells. The data demonstrate that the carboxy terminus of AFAP-110 is both necessary and sufficient for actin filament association, in vivo and in vitro. Analysis of the carboxy terminus revealed a mean 40% similarity with other known actin-binding motifs, indicating a mechanism for binding to actin filaments. AFAP-110 can also induce lamellipodia formation. Contiguous with the alpha-helical, actin-binding motif is an alpha-helical, leucine zipper motif. Deletion of the leucine zipper motif (AFAP(Deltalzip)) followed by cellular expression enabled AFAP(Deltalzip) to alter actin filament integrity and cell shape in untransformed cells as evidenced by the induction of lamellipodia formation. We hypothesize that AFAP-110 may be an important signaling protein that can directly modulate changes in actin filament integrity and induce lamellipodia formation.

PMID:
10666339
DOI:
10.1006/excr.1999.4795
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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