Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Stroke. 2000 Feb;31(2):404-9.

Influence of admission body temperature on stroke mortality.

Author information

1
Centre for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Royal Newcastle Hospital, New South Wales, Australia. wyang@cceb.newcastle.edu.au

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

The influence of body temperature on stroke outcome remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic role of admission body temperature on short-term and long-term mortality in a retrospective cohort study of patients with acute stroke.

METHODS:

A retrospective cohort of 509 patients with acute stroke, admitted to a tertiary hospital between July 1, 1995, and June 30, 1997, was studied. The relationship between admission body temperature and mortality both in-hospital and at 1-year mortality was evaluated. Body temperature on admission was classified as hypothermia (</=36.5 degrees C), normothermia (>36.5 degrees C and </=37.5 degrees C), and hyperthermia (>37.5 degrees C). Logistic regression and proportional hazards function analysis were performed after adjustment for clinical predictors of stroke outcome.

RESULTS:

In ischemic stoke, mortality was lower among patients with hypothermia and higher among patients with hyperthermia. The odds ratio for in-hospital mortality in hypothermic versus normothermic patients was 0.1 (95% CI, 0.02 to 0.5). The relative risk for 1-year mortality of hyperthermic versus normothermic patients was 3.4 (95% CI, 1.6 to 7.3). A similar but nonsignificant trend for in-hospital mortality was seen among patients with hemorrhagic stroke.

CONCLUSIONS:

An association between admission body temperature and stroke mortality was noted independent of clinical variables of stroke severity. Hyperthermia was associated with an increase in 1-year mortality. Hypothermia was associated with a reduction in in-hospital mortality.

PMID:
10657413
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Support Center