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Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2000 Jan;12(1):5-11.

Effect of a vegetable-protein-rich polymeric diet treatment on body composition and energy metabolism in inactive Crohn's disease.

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1
Institute of Internal Medicine, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy. ecapristo@pelagus.it

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Since malnutrition and lactose intolerance are frequently reported in Crohn's disease (CD), we evaluated the differences in terms of compliance-to-treatment and nutritional status in inactive CD patients after two different treatments using either a standard polymeric diet or a vegetable-protein-rich and lactose-free diet.

STUDY DESIGN:

A case-control study.

SUBJECTS:

Forty CD patients with inactive disease were randomly divided into two groups. Group A (10 men; aged 33.9+/-7.2 years; BMI, 21.8+/-1.7 kg/m2) received a conventional polymeric enteral diet, while group B (10 men; aged 35.6+/-6.8 years; BMI, 21.4+/-1.8 kg/m2) was administered a soy-rich and lactose-free polymeric diet, over a 4-week period.

METHODS:

All the patients had a clinical and laboratory examination. Body composition was assessed by isotopic dilution and resting metabolic rate (RMR), and substrate oxidation rates were measured by indirect calorimetry.

RESULTS:

Body weight significantly increased after treatment in both groups (A, P<0.05; and B, P<0.01), as well as fat-free mass (A, P<0.05; and B, P<0.05) and fat mass (A, P<0.05; and B, P<0.01). RMR slightly increased, although it did not reach statistical significance. Treatment did not influence substrate oxidation rates. Group B lactose-intolerant patients reported a greater compliance-to-treatment than those in group A.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study showed that a polymeric enteral diet rich in vegetable protein and not containing milk protein, eaten at home, with no need for positioning a nasogastric tube, significantly improved body composition in inactive and lactose-intolerant CD patients, with no effect on energy metabolism, suggesting that it could be useful in improving nutritional status in these patients.

PMID:
10656203
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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