Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Gastrointest Endosc. 2000 Feb;51(2):123-8.

How gastroenterologists screen for colonic cancer in ulcerative colitis: an analysis of performance.

Author information

1
Gastrointestinal Research Unit, Leicester General Hospital, Leicester, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The aim of this study was to assess the colorectal cancer surveillance practices of British gastroenterologists for patients with ulcerative colitis.

METHODS:

A questionnaire that investigated aspects of surveillance in patients with ulcerative colitis was mailed to all consultant gastroenterologists in the U.K. (n = 413).

RESULTS:

Three hundred forty-one questionnaires were returned (response rate 83%). Ninety-four percent of consultants practice cancer surveillance in ulcerative colitis, with 35% maintaining a registry of patients in surveillance programs. All gastroenterologists perform surveillance in patients with pancolitis, 24% in those with left-sided colitis and 2% in patients with proctitis. The mean duration of disease before surveillance is commenced is 9.2 years for pancolitis and 12.4 years for left-sided colitis (p < 0.0001). Only 4% of gastroenterologists routinely offer patients with disease of more than 10 years' duration a prophylactic colectomy. Colonoscopies are conducted by an accredited gastroenterologist in 65% of cases and biopsies are reviewed by specialists in gastrointestinal pathology in 45%. When histology reveals low-grade dysplasia only 4% advise colectomy and when high-grade dysplasia is found 53% recommend colectomy. Sixteen percent of gastroenterologists were unaware of the significance of a dysplasia associated lesion or mass.

CONCLUSION:

The majority of gastroenterologists practice surveillance on a disorganized basis. There is inconsistency in the management of patients with dysplasia and education of gastroenterologists is needed.

PMID:
10650251
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center