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Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2000 Jan;182(1 Pt 1):135-41.

Interleukin 16 in pregnancy, parturition, rupture of fetal membranes, and microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity.

Author information

1
Perinatology Research Branch, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Wayne State University/Hutzel Hospital, Detroit, MD 48201, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Interleukin 16 is a proinflammatory cytokine that promotes the recruitment of nonclonotypic T cells and eosinophils to sites of inflammation and induces resistance to activation-induced apoptosis. This peptide has no homology with members of the chemokine family and is produced by epithelial cells. No information is available about the expression of this cytokine during human pregnancy. This study was conducted to determine whether interleukin 16 is present in amniotic fluid and to examine the effects of labor and intrauterine infection on the concentrations of this cytokine.

STUDY DESIGN:

A cross-sectional study was constructed with 230 women in the following groups: (1) mid- trimester (n = 25); (2) term not in labor (n = 25), term in labor (n = 25), and term premature rupture of membranes not in labor (n = 40); (3) preterm labor and intact membranes with (n = 21) and without (n = 42) intra-ammiotic infection; and (4) preterm premature rupture of membranes in the presence (n = 29) and absence (n = 23) of microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity. Interleukin 16 concentration was measured with sensitive and specific immunoassays validated for amniotic fluid. Data were analyzed with nonparametric statistics.

RESULTS:

(1) Interleukin 16 was detected in 87.8% (202/230) of amniotic fluid samples. (2) Amniotic fluid interleukin 16 concentrations were significantly higher in women in the midtrimester than in those at term not in labor (median, 321.5 pg/mL; range, 146.9-1185.8 pg/mL; vs median, 85.9 pg/mL; range, <25-409.8 pg/mL; P <.001). (3) Labor at term was not associated with a significant increase in the median amniotic fluid interleukin 16 concentration. (4) Patients with preterm labor who delivered preterm had a significantly higher median amniotic fluid interleukin 16 concentration than those with preterm labor who delivered at term (median, 328.1 pg/mL; range, 38. 9-4660 pg/mL; vs median, 119.8 pg/mL; range, <25-558.5 pg/mL;P <.05). (5) Microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity was associated with a significant increase in median amniotic fluid interleukin 16 concentration in patients with preterm labor and intact membranes (microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity: median, 839 pg/mL; range, <25-8620 pg/mL; vs no microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity: median, 119.8 pg/mL; range, <25-558.5 pg/mL; P <.001) and in patients with preterm premature rupture of the membranes (microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity: median, 1005.8 pg/mL; range, <25-4590 pg/mL; vs no microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity: median, 204.9 pg/mL; range, 42.6-2347 pg/mL; P <.05). (6) Spontaneous rupture of the membranes at term but not preterm was associated with a significant decrease in amniotic fluid concentrations of interleukin 16 (term premature rupture of the membranes: median, <25 pg/mL; range, <25-231.2 pg/mL; vs term intact membranes: median, 85.9 pg/mL; range, <25-409.8 pg/mL; P <.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Amniotic fluid interleukin-16 concentrations decreased with advancing gestational age. Women with preterm labor that led to preterm delivery and women with microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity had higher interleukin 16 amniotic fluid concentrations than those with preterm labor who delivered at term or those with sterile amniotic fluid. Microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity but not spontaneous labor at term or rupture of membranes was associated with increased concentrations of interleukin 16 in amniotic fluid.

PMID:
10649168
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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