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Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2000 Jan;182(1 Pt 1):68-75.

Effectiveness of Agency for Health Care Policy and Research clinical practice guideline and patient education methods for pregnant smokers in medicaid maternity care.

Author information

1
University of Alabama at Birmingham 35294-1250, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The purposes of this study were (1) to determine the extent to which tobacco exposure assessment and new patient education methods, derived from a meta-analysis and the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research guideline recommendations, could be provided routinely by trained Medicaid maternity care staff members and (2) to document the behavioral impact of these interventions among pregnant smokers.

STUDY DESIGN:

After 265 pregnant smokers were assigned at their first visit to an experimental group (n = 139) or a control group (n = 126), they received standardized risk information and were advised to quit smoking. The experimental group also received evidence-based patient education methods, including the videocassette Commit to Quit During and After Pregnancy, the publication A Pregnant Woman's Guide to Quit Smoking, and a brief counseling session. Self-report and saliva cotinine assessments of tobacco exposure were performed at baseline and at the end of pregnancy.

RESULTS:

A significantly higher percentage of patients quit smoking in the experimental group (17.3%) than in the control group (8.8%).

CONCLUSIONS:

The application of principles of organizational development and quality improvement at the management and clinical practice levels and the delivery of evidence-based health education methods by trained prenatal care providers significantly increased smoking cessation rates among pregnant Medicaid recipients.

PMID:
10649158
DOI:
10.1016/s0002-9378(00)70492-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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