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J AAPOS. 1998 Oct;2(5):285-92.

Ocular motility disturbances after surgery for retinal detachment.

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1
Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, United Kingdom.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Relatively little has been published on the management of motility problems after surgery for retinal detachment. We report a large series with the aim of describing clinical features, management, and outcome.

METHODS:

The charts of 68 of 86 consecutive patients referred to one of us between 1989 and 1995 were retrieved and analyzed. Sixty-two had unilateral and 6 bilateral surgery for retinal detachment. In 45 cases the macula was detached at surgery. The visual acuity of the affected eyes ranged from hand motions to 6/6. Sensory testing suggested potential binocular function in 39.7%. Fifty-nine patients had combined vertical and horizontal strabismus, 8 horizontal alone, and 1 vertical only. The average vertical deviation measured 10.2 PD and the average horizontal 19 PD.

RESULTS:

Twelve patients underwent strabismus surgery, 26 were treated with botulinum toxin, 21 were managed conservatively with prisms or occlusion, and 8 refused or did not require treatment. Forty-seven percent of the group regained binocularity (20.5% cured with surgery or botulinum toxin, 26.5% controlled with prisms or intermittent injection with botulinum toxin). A total of 20.7% gained improvement in appearance, 19.1% were managed with permanent occlusion, and 13.2% either refused or did not require treatment.

CONCLUSION:

Macula off retinal detachment, poor visual acuity plus or minus distortion, and multiple procedures for retinal reattachment are associated with a poor prognosis for restoration of binocular vision and a good outcome. In our hands, botulinum toxin treatment is the method of choice, with surgery used in selected cases.

PMID:
10646750
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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