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J Adolesc Health. 2000 Jan;26(1):18-26.

Parental underestimates of adolescent risk behavior: a randomized, controlled trial of a parental monitoring intervention.

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1
Center for Minority Health Research, Department of Pediatrics, University of Maryland, Baltimore, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To develop and evaluate an intervention (ImPACT) seeking to increase monitoring (supervision and communication) by parents and guardians of African-American youth regarding high risk and protective behaviors; and to develop an instrument to assess parental monitoring, the Parent-Adolescent Risk Behavior Concordance Scale.

DESIGN/INTERVENTION:

This research was a randomized, controlled longitudinal study. Baseline (preintervention), and 2 and 6 months postintervention data were obtained via a talking MacIntosh computer regarding youth and parent perceptions of youth involvement in 10 risk behaviors, parental monitoring and youth-parent communication, and condom-use skills. Intervention parents and youth received the ImPACT program and a video emphasizing parental supervision and discussion, followed by a structured discussion and role-play emphasizing key points. Control parents and youth received an attention-control program on goal-setting, which also included an at-home video and discussion.

PARTICIPANTS:

A total of 237 parents and one each of their youth (ages 12-16 years) recruited from eight public housing developments located in a city in the mid-Atlantic region.

RESULTS:

Similarity of youth and parental reporting on the Parent-Adolescent Risk Behavior Concordance Scale was positively correlated with protective behaviors, perceived parental monitoring, and good parent-youth communication. At baseline, parents significantly underestimated their youth's risk behaviors. However, 2 and 6 months postintervention, the ImPACT program increased similarity of reports by youth and their parents of youth involvement in risk and protective behaviors. In addition, at 6 months postintervention, intervention (compared to control) youths and parents also demonstrated higher levels of condom-use skills.

CONCLUSION:

Parental monitoring interventions such as ImPACT should be given to parents in conjunction with more traditional youth-centered risk-reduction interventions.

PMID:
10638714
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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