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Ann Surg. 2000 Jan;231(1):59-66.

Indicators for treatment strategies of colorectal liver metastases.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery I, National Defense Medical College, Tokorozawa, Saitama, Japan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To analyze the survival predictors of patients undergoing hepatectomy for colorectal liver metastasis to determine useful indicators for therapy selection.

SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA:

Although recurrence develops in more than two thirds of patients undergoing hepatectomy for colorectal liver metastasis, preoperative characteristics that might predict such recurrence have yet to be clearly identified.

METHODS:

Clinicopathologic data of 85 consecutive patients with colorectal cancer who underwent a curative resection of primary lesions and metastatic liver diseases at one institute were analyzed using the multivariate method with respect to both the metastatic state and the primary lesion.

RESULTS:

Multivariate analysis indicated that the aggressiveness of the primary tumor, early liver metastasis, and a large number of liver metastases were the characteristics that could be detected before hepatectomy and that independently indicated a worse survival. A three-ranked classification based on these coefficients (H-staging) was significantly related to both the recurrence rate within 6 months (7% in H-stage A, 30% in B, and 44% in C) and the 5-year survival rates (55%, 14%, and 0% respectively). An additional scoring system (H'-staging) based on the aggressiveness of the primary tumor and the level of carcinoembryonic antigen 1 to 3 months after hepatectomy was found to be related to the mode of subsequent recurrence and surgical resectability of the recurrent foci.

CONCLUSIONS:

H-staging can provide useful prognostic information for the treatment of liver metastasis. H-staging could also help in predicting the possible mode of recurrence after hepatectomy and in determining the most suitable mode of additional therapy. Further multiinstitutional studies based on a large collective database will confirm the utility of these two staging systems.

PMID:
10636103
PMCID:
PMC1420966
DOI:
10.1097/00000658-200001000-00009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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