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Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2000 Jan;126(1):21-5.

Pediatric vocal fold paralysis: a long-term retrospective study.

Author information

1
Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London, England. HamidDaya@compuserve.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To review our experience of pediatric vocal fold paralysis (VFP), with particular emphasis on etiological factors, associated airway pathologic conditions, and treatment and prognostic outcomes.

DESIGN:

Retrospective case review of a cohort of patients presenting with VFP.

SETTING:

Tertiary referral center.

PATIENTS:

A consecutive sample of 102 patients presenting with VFP to Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London, England, over a 14-year period from 1980 to 1994.

RESULTS:

There was an almost equal distribution of unilateral (52% [n = 53]) and bilateral (48% [n = 49]) VFP. Iatrogenic causes (43% [n = 44]) formed the largest group, followed by idiopathic VFP (35% [n = 36]), neurological causes (16% [n = 16]), and finally birth trauma (5% [n = 5]). Associated upper airway pathologic conditions were noted in 66% (n = 23) of patients who underwent tracheotomy. Tracheotomy was necessary in only 57% (n = 28) of children with bilateral VFP. Prognosis was variable depending upon the cause, with neurological VFP having the highest rate of recovery (71% [5/7]) and iatrogenic VFP the lowest rate (46% [12/26]).

CONCLUSION:

Recovery after an interval of up to 11 years was seen in idiopathic bilateral VFP; this has significant implications when considering lateralization procedures in these patients.

PMID:
10628706
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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