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Pediatrics. 2000 Jan;105(1 Pt 3):267-71.

The impact of a brief intervention on maternal smoking behavior.

Author information

1
Section of Ambulatory Pediatrics, Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH, USA. jgroner@chi.osu.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine if mothers receiving a smoking cessation intervention emphasizing health risks of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) for their children have a higher quit rate than 1) mothers receiving routine smoking cessation advice or 2) a control group.

DESIGN:

Randomized, controlled trial.

SETTING:

Primary care center in a large urban children's hospital.

INTERVENTION:

Four hundred seventy-nine mothers were randomly assigned to a smoking cessation intervention either aimed at their child's health or their own health, or to a control group receiving safety information.

OUTCOME MEASURES:

Smoking status, stage of change, cigarettes/day, location smoking occurred, and knowledge of ETS effects.

RESULTS:

Complete data (baseline and both follow-ups) were available for 166 subjects. There was no impact of group assignment on the quit rate, cigarettes/day, or stage of change. The Child Health Group intervention had a sustained effect on location where smoking reportedly occurred (usually outside) and on improved knowledge of ETS effects.

CONCLUSIONS:

Further research is needed to devise more effective methods of using the pediatric health care setting to influence adult smoking behaviors.

PMID:
10617734
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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