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Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1999 Dec 1;45(5):1289-96.

The synthetic somatostatin analogue, octreotide, ameliorates acute and delayed intestinal radiation injury.

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1
Department of Surgery, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Reducing intraluminal proteolytic activity attenuates intestinal radiation toxicity. This study assessed whether pharmacological inhibition of exocrine pancreatic secretion protects against early and delayed radiation enteropathy in a preclinical rat model.

METHODS AND MATERIALS:

Rat ileum was sham-irradiated or exposed to 16 once-daily 4.2 Gy fractions of X-radiation. Vehicle or somatostatin analogue (octreotide, 2 microg/kg/hr) were administered from 2 days prior to 10 days after the end of irradiation. Mucosal injury was monitored noninvasively by assessment of granulocyte transmigration. Radiation injury was assessed at 2 weeks (early phase) and 26 weeks (chronic phase) using quantitative histopathology, immunohistochemistry, and morphometry.

RESULTS:

Octreotide decreased granulocyte transmigration (p<0.0006), reduced accumulation of myeloperoxidase-positive cells at 2 weeks (p = 0.0002), attenuated structural injury at 2 weeks (p = 0.04) and 26 weeks (p = 0.02), preserved mucosal surface area at 2 weeks (p = 0.0008) and 26 weeks p = 0.0008), and reduced intestinal wall thickening at 26 weeks (p = 0.002). Octreotide did not affect granulocyte transmigration, histology, or mucosal surface area in sham-irradiated controls.

CONCLUSION:

These results demonstrate the importance of consequential mechanisms in the pathogenesis of chronic radiation enteropathy. Short-term octreotide administration ameliorates acute radiation-induced mucosal injury, as well as chronic structural changes, and should be subject to further preclinical and clinical testing.

PMID:
10613325
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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